ANTI-PROPAGANDA

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Posts tagged with "US"

Mar 3
lillabet:

There was a drone strike in Yemen today.

lillabet:

There was a drone strike in Yemen today.

generalinjusticeblog:

A Week in the Sty 11/25/13
Police in Columbia, South Carolina and 499 Other Cities Get “Free” Tanks
Driver Arrested in Ohio for Secret Car Compartment Full of Nothing
SF cops beat cyclist, passersby trying to intervene
Fired Pa. cop guilty of man’s holding cell beating
6 years after man goes missing, ex-Jefferson Parish deputy pleads guilty to federal charges
Soldier home to mourn loss of father dies in officer-involved shooting
More Brutality Allegations Against Police Officer
Crack pipe found in Dallas senior corporal’s squad car
Policewoman says she endured years of sexual harassment by internal affairs boss
Ex-cops on trial for slaying over stolen pizza claim self-defense
EXCLUSIVE: NYPD Commissioner Raymond Kelly won’t fire cop for bad shooting
2 deputies arrested after punching inmate, faking report
Guilty verdict returned on Grisham retrial, despite officer caught lying. Prosecution went with highest charge they could get away with after lowering charges twice in previous trial that ended with mistrial.
Police Report Shows Increase in Fatal Shootings by New York Officers
Jury selection begins on Kelly Thomas murder trial. already it looks like the cops will walk by the questions being posed to potential jurors, and the judge’s behavior 
Mich. police sergeants charged with armed robbery
Norwich police officer & firefighter, who are also husband & wife, arrested after domestic dispute
Drivers Stopped at Roadblock Asked for Saliva, Blood
Bucks DA: Teen possibly fell running from police after Tullytown shoplifting arrest
Arlington assistant police chief arrested for family violence | ArlingtonVoice.com
Del City police captain’s manslaughter trial set to begin
SEE IT: New Mexico state troopers shoot at woman in speeding in van with five kids  
Woman Assaults Videographer in Front of Tucson Cops, Who Claim They Saw Nothing - Photography is Not a Crime: PINAC
Bulletproof Part 1 - Houston Chronicle
Chicago Officer Charged in Off-Duty Fatal Shooting
Task Force Head Claims ‘Terrorism’ Behind $160,000 Seizure
On-duty officer sexually assaults 19-year-old during traffic stop, police say
Police allegedly warned to ‘be aware’ of Cop Block group
Defense Department gives war vehicles to local sheriffs
Erie Police Investigate Facebook Photo
UPDATE: Charges dropped against brothers in video of questionable excessive police force
Oxnard Police Under Fire After Caught-on-Camera Confrontation
Marshal’s stun gun confrontation with co-worker sparked two investigations
Nevada Lawmaker to Police: Please Stop Killing Our Dogs
Off-duty trooper crashes into on-duty trooper; 14-year veteran charged with driving under influence of drugs, alcohol
Jasper woman gets $75,000 settlement in police brutality case. Two officers and a dispatcher fired
My two wheels vs. their badges
Businessman arrested for loitering, carrying legal gun on own property
Natchitoches assistant police chief suspended for one day
Charges Dropped in Cyberbullying Death, but Sheriff Isn’t Backing Down
Hamlet police seize and sell vehicles for scrap forget to report cash
Woman claims officer sprayed mace on genitals
Dashcam Video Of Vet’s Arrest For ‘Rudely Displaying Rifle’ Reveals The Context Everyone’s Been Waiting For
14 Baltimore corrections officers arrested, accused of taking bribes, bringing drugs, and having sex with prison gang members. Four of the guards became pregnant.
Annie Dookhan, former state chemist who mishandled drug evidence, agrees to plead guilty - Metro
Ex-Detective Guilty In Tax Case
Former Seattle ATF supervisor indicted in embezzlement case
Fired Avalon cop guilty of man’s holding cell beating
Officer beats DWI charge
Did cop with history of brawling punch a 14-year-old girl?
2nd Dallas officer punished in man’s shooting
Metro police officer arrested for choking son, pushing wife
 Stowe faces suit over luring case
Greenfield officer resigns as part of plea in excessive force case
Man files lawsuit against Fayetteville police officer who shot him last year
Officer charged with lying to get search warrant
Woman sues city, police over encounter with officer
Former Columbia police chief pleads no contest
Police officer charged with drunk driving
Burlington Police officer arraigned on charges of illegally obtaining prescription drugs and making fake disability claims
Deptford Police officer pleads not-guilty to murder charge; victim’s family call James Stuart ‘uncaring, dispassionate’
Former Irwindale police officer gets one year in jail for stealing father’s $250,000
Mich. police sergeants charged with armed robbery
Teacher files federal lawsuit against Pittsburgh police officer after Homewood arrest
Dallas Police officer arrested on charge of possession of drug paraphernalia
Ex-police officer convicted of sexually abusing girl who was member of choir he directed
Coal Township officer suspended for procedural violation

generalinjusticeblog:

A Week in the Sty 11/25/13

Police in Columbia, South Carolina and 499 Other Cities Get “Free” Tanks

Driver Arrested in Ohio for Secret Car Compartment Full of Nothing

SF cops beat cyclist, passersby trying to intervene

Fired Pa. cop guilty of man’s holding cell beating

6 years after man goes missing, ex-Jefferson Parish deputy pleads guilty to federal charges

Soldier home to mourn loss of father dies in officer-involved shooting

More Brutality Allegations Against Police Officer

Crack pipe found in Dallas senior corporal’s squad car

Policewoman says she endured years of sexual harassment by internal affairs boss

Ex-cops on trial for slaying over stolen pizza claim self-defense

EXCLUSIVE: NYPD Commissioner Raymond Kelly won’t fire cop for bad shooting

2 deputies arrested after punching inmate, faking report

Guilty verdict returned on Grisham retrial, despite officer caught lying. Prosecution went with highest charge they could get away with after lowering charges twice in previous trial that ended with mistrial.

Police Report Shows Increase in Fatal Shootings by New York Officers

Jury selection begins on Kelly Thomas murder trial. already it looks like the cops will walk by the questions being posed to potential jurors, and the judge’s behavior

Mich. police sergeants charged with armed robbery

Norwich police officer & firefighter, who are also husband & wife, arrested after domestic dispute

Drivers Stopped at Roadblock Asked for Saliva, Blood

Bucks DA: Teen possibly fell running from police after Tullytown shoplifting arrest

Arlington assistant police chief arrested for family violence | ArlingtonVoice.com

Del City police captain’s manslaughter trial set to begin

SEE IT: New Mexico state troopers shoot at woman in speeding in van with five kids  

Woman Assaults Videographer in Front of Tucson Cops, Who Claim They Saw Nothing - Photography is Not a Crime: PINAC

Bulletproof Part 1 - Houston Chronicle

Chicago Officer Charged in Off-Duty Fatal Shooting

Task Force Head Claims ‘Terrorism’ Behind $160,000 Seizure

On-duty officer sexually assaults 19-year-old during traffic stop, police say

Police allegedly warned to ‘be aware’ of Cop Block group

Defense Department gives war vehicles to local sheriffs

Erie Police Investigate Facebook Photo

UPDATE: Charges dropped against brothers in video of questionable excessive police force

Oxnard Police Under Fire After Caught-on-Camera Confrontation

Marshal’s stun gun confrontation with co-worker sparked two investigations

Nevada Lawmaker to Police: Please Stop Killing Our Dogs

Off-duty trooper crashes into on-duty trooper; 14-year veteran charged with driving under influence of drugs, alcohol

Jasper woman gets $75,000 settlement in police brutality case. Two officers and a dispatcher fired

My two wheels vs. their badges

Businessman arrested for loitering, carrying legal gun on own property

Natchitoches assistant police chief suspended for one day

Charges Dropped in Cyberbullying Death, but Sheriff Isn’t Backing Down

Hamlet police seize and sell vehicles for scrap forget to report cash

Woman claims officer sprayed mace on genitals

Dashcam Video Of Vet’s Arrest For ‘Rudely Displaying Rifle’ Reveals The Context Everyone’s Been Waiting For

14 Baltimore corrections officers arrested, accused of taking bribes, bringing drugs, and having sex with prison gang members. Four of the guards became pregnant.

Annie Dookhan, former state chemist who mishandled drug evidence, agrees to plead guilty - Metro

Ex-Detective Guilty In Tax Case

Former Seattle ATF supervisor indicted in embezzlement case

Fired Avalon cop guilty of man’s holding cell beating

Officer beats DWI charge

Did cop with history of brawling punch a 14-year-old girl?

2nd Dallas officer punished in man’s shooting

Metro police officer arrested for choking son, pushing wife

 Stowe faces suit over luring case

Greenfield officer resigns as part of plea in excessive force case

Man files lawsuit against Fayetteville police officer who shot him last year

Officer charged with lying to get search warrant

Woman sues city, police over encounter with officer

Former Columbia police chief pleads no contest

Police officer charged with drunk driving

Burlington Police officer arraigned on charges of illegally obtaining prescription drugs and making fake disability claims

Deptford Police officer pleads not-guilty to murder charge; victim’s family call James Stuart ‘uncaring, dispassionate’

Former Irwindale police officer gets one year in jail for stealing father’s $250,000

Mich. police sergeants charged with armed robbery

Teacher files federal lawsuit against Pittsburgh police officer after Homewood arrest

Dallas Police officer arrested on charge of possession of drug paraphernalia

Ex-police officer convicted of sexually abusing girl who was member of choir he directed

Coal Township officer suspended for procedural violation

priceofliberty:

freexcitizen:

anal-warfare:

freexcitizen:

anal-warfare:

gray-firearms:

Wow just wow

the worst part is this is real

Really? Is there a source

Yeah.  Surprisingly enough, even Huffpo picked up on it http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/14/homeland-security-report_n_186834.html

Race baiting much there huffpost. Jesus those people are assholes

Operation Vigilant Eagle and the American “Takeover”

Operation Vigilant Eagle is an American law-enforcement effort headed by the FBI aimed at preventing political violence by “lone wolf” terrorists. The operation was first mentioned in the Wall Street Journal in April 2009.[1]
In this case a "lone wolf" is a person who operates alone, outside of extremest organizations. Examples included Theodore Kaczynski, the Unabomber, Scott Roeder who killed a Kansas abortion doctor and James von Brunn who attacked the American United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Such attackers are hard to detect as they do not associate with other extremists.

priceofliberty:

freexcitizen:

anal-warfare:

freexcitizen:

anal-warfare:

gray-firearms:

Wow just wow

the worst part is this is real

Really? Is there a source

Yeah.  Surprisingly enough, even Huffpo picked up on it http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/14/homeland-security-report_n_186834.html

Race baiting much there huffpost. Jesus those people are assholes

Operation Vigilant Eagle and the American “Takeover”

Operation Vigilant Eagle is an American law-enforcement effort headed by the FBI aimed at preventing political violence by “lone wolf” terrorists. The operation was first mentioned in the Wall Street Journal in April 2009.[1]

In this case a "lone wolf" is a person who operates alone, outside of extremest organizations. Examples included Theodore Kaczynski, the Unabomber, Scott Roeder who killed a Kansas abortion doctor and James von Brunn who attacked the American United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Such attackers are hard to detect as they do not associate with other extremists.

(Source: guns-and-humor)

Nov 7

America’s “Secret Wars” in Over 100 Countries Around the World

Blackwater’s founder, Erik Prince, was recruited as a CIA asset in 2004, and in subsequent years acquired over $1.5 billion in contracts from the Pentagon and CIA, and included among its leadership several former top-level CIA officials. Blackwater, which primarily hires former Special Forces soldiers, has largely functioned “as an overseas Praetorian guard for the CIA and State Department officials,” who were also “helping to craft, fund, and execute operations,” including “assembling hit teams,” all outside of any Congressional or public oversight (since it was technically a private corporation).8

The CIA hired Blackwater to aid in a secret assassination program which was hidden from Congress for seven years. 9 These operations would be overseen by the CIA or Special Forces personnel. 10 Blackwater has also been contracted to arm drones at secret bases in Afghanistan and Pakistan for Obama’s assassination program, overseen by the CIA. 11 The lines dividing the military, the CIA and Blackwater had become “blurred,” as one former CIA official commented, “It became a very brotherly relationship… There was a feeling that Blackwater eventually become an extension of the agency.” 12

The “secret war” in Pakistan may have begun under Bush, but it had rapidly expanded in the following years of the Obama administration. Wikileaks cables confirmed the operation of JSOC forces inside of Pakistan, with Pakistani Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani telling the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan, Anne Patterson (who would later be appointed as ambassador to Egypt), that, “I don’t care if they do it as long as they get the right people. We’ll protest in the National Assembly and then ignore it.”13

Within the first five months of Obama’s presidency in 2009, he authorized “a massive expansion of clandestine military and intelligence operations worldwide,” granting the Pentagon’s regional combatant commanders “significant new authority” over such covert operations. 14 The directive came from General Petraeus, commander of CENTCOM, authorizing Special Forces soldiers to be sent into “both friendly and hostile nations in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Horn of Africa.” The deployment of highly trained killers into dozens of countries was to become “systemic and long term,” designed to “penetrate, disrupt, defeat or destroy” enemies of the State, beyond the rule of law, no trial or pretenses of accountability. They also “prepare the environment” for larger attacks that the U.S. or NATO countries may have planned. Unlike with the CIA, these operations do not report to Congress, or even need “the President’s approval.” But for the big operations, they get the approval of the National Security Council (NSC), which includes the president, as well as most other major cabinet heads, of the Pentagon, CIA, State Department, etc.15

(Source: azspot)

If US fought against terrorism, it would support Assad

Supporters of Syrian regime stand behind a placard featuring Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (AFP Photo / Mahmoud Zayyat)

'If the US wanted to fight against terrorism, they would support the secular regime of President Assad in Syria, not Al-Qaeda, investigative journalist Neil Clark told RT.

RT: How much of the turmoil and violence we’re currently seeing in Iraq and Afghanistan can be directly blamed on NATO interventions?

Neil Clark: I think they can all be directly blamed on the NATO interventions. Because we think back at the so-called interventions, I mean they all were built as humanitarian ventures, weren’t they? It was NATO the benign, NATO the powers led by the United States. We are going to these countries to liberate the people from these wicked dictators like Saddam Hussein, Mullah Omar or Colonel Gaddafi. And in every instance of the so-called interventions the result has been death and destruction, it has been absolute chaos. In Iraq, a new study said that at least 500,000 people have been killed since the invasion and it could be even more. So, I think the consequences of these interventions have been anything but humanitarian. They’ve been war crimes. I think for people living in these countries it has been a nightmare what has happened since these NATO interventions. So, I think, yes, NATO is to blame.

RT:  Iraq is in the middle of its worst spike of violence in years…. Has the war in neighboring Syria further destabilized Iraq?

NC: Absolutely. I think there is no coincidence. There has been a huge spike in violence in Iraq since the destabilization of Syria has taken place since 2011, of course, because the US has been helping the Islamist terrorists there to try to topple the secular, independently-minded government of President Assad. There is no coincidence that there has been a huge spike in violence in Syria and in Iraq at the same time. Al-Qaeda groups are going from Iraq to Syria, and from Syria to Iraq. The whole region is in turmoil because of US policies. And this is not a mistake. Well, it is a mistake to think it is a mistake, if you like, because whenever the Neo-Cons come on to talk about Iraq, and of course they are rarely ready to talk about Iraq, they always like to claim that Tony Blair and George W. Bush wanted well, but they made a few mistakes along the way. That is nonsense. The whole aim of the exercise was to destroy Iraq as a functioning country, to make sure it will never again be a threat to regional powers that the US backs in that region. The same is with Syria. I think this is all deliberate. What we are talking about is a deliberate destruction of independently-minded countries in that region.

RT: Western powers claim to be fighting against international terrorism, and yet they’ve supported rebels in both Libya and Syria… How would you explain this apparent contradiction?

NC: It is the biggest myth in the whole of international relations. The biggest myth is that the United States and its allies are implacably opposed to terrorist groups around the world, and particularly Al-Qaeda and Islamic terrorist groups. They are not. They all use Al-Qaeda and terrorist groups like them to help them to topple secular independently-minded governments like President Assad in Syria, Gaddafi in Libya and elsewhere, but they would also use the presence of Al-Qaeda groups in order to intervene in the countries where they want a regime change, like Mali, for example, or Afghanistan. So, in fact, the West uses Al-Qaeda, uses Islamic groups and is not implacably opposed to them. That is a great myth. Nobody has done more to boost the rise of Al-Qaeda in the last 20 years than the United States. That is a fact.

RT: Al-Qaeda seems to be expanding its network and becoming more organized – is there any way to stop this trend?

NC: It goes back to the US. I don’t think the US wants to stop it. Al-Qaeda serves a very useful purpose for American foreign policy and for Israel, too, and for Saudi Arabia. The fact is that if Al-Qaeda did not exist, it should have been invented. It serves for a lot of good purposes for the Unites States to push its agenda around the world. I think there is going to be a sea-change in the US. If the US was really serious about Al-Qaeda and wanted to deal with it, they would do, they would not be supporting Al-Qaeda in Syria, they would not be wanting a secular regime in Syria to be toppled. They would be actually supporting President Assad in Syria. They would not want a regime change in Libya, would they? So, to answer the question, I think that the future Al-Qaeda depends on the US. They US helped create Al-Qaeda, this Islamic terrorism. It is up to the US to stop it if it really wanted to. But their policy show that they are not really interested in doing it, I am afraid.’

21 nations line up behind United Nations effort to restrain U.S. NSA

shortformblog:

An effort in the United Nations by Brazil and Germany to hold back government surveillance is quickly picking up steam, as the uproar over American eavesdropping grows.

The German and Brazilian delegations to the U.N. have opened talks with diplomats from 19 more countries to draft a General Resolution promoting the right of privacy on the Internet. Close American allies like France and Mexico — as well as rivals like Cuba and Venezuela — are all part of the effort.

The push marks the first major international effort to curb the National Security Agency’svast surveillance network. Its momentum is building. And it comes as concerns are growing within the U.S. intelligence community that the NSA may be, in effect, freelancing foreign policy by eavesdropping on leaders like Germany’s Angela Merkel.

The draft, acopyof which was obtained byThe Cable, calls on states “to respect and ensure the respect for the rights” to privacy, as enshrined in the 1976 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It also calls on states “to take measures to put an end to violations of these rights” and to “review their procedures, practices and legislation regarding the extraterritorial surveillance of private communications and interception of personal data of citizens in foreign jurisdictions with a view towards upholding the right to privacy.”

The draft does not refer to a flurry of American spying revelations that have caused a political uproar around the world. But it was clear that the revelations provided the political momentum to trigger the move to the U.N.

This is huge. It just so clearly shows the growing anti-Americanism in governments abroad after the continuing National Security Agency surveillance and spying programs. The latest? The U.S. NSA obtained over 60 million phone calls in Spain

Oct 4

Can Iran Trust the United States?

laliberty:

Also, can someone remind me which country it was that has actually used nuclear weapons on people (twice!), killing countless innocents thanks to the indiscriminate destruction characteristic of such weapons?

(Source: laliberty)

Oct 2
laliberty:

You are all getting played.
Why would a sudden “lapse” in funding cause web sites to immediately go down? Did the jpegs go on strike? Was the html furloughed? Are government employees required to actively run on hamster wheels in order to keep ones and zeros hosted on a site and a network owned by the government? Indeed, would it not be more expensive to employ people to take down or block access to sites than leaving the data up as-is?
Julian Sanchez points out: 

Browse to any of their pages and you’ll see, for a split second, the full content of the page you want—only to be redirected to a shutdown notice page also hosted at FTC.gov. But that means… their servers are still up and running and actually serving all the same content. In fact they’re serving more content: first the real page, then the shutdown notice page. If you’re using Firefox or Chrome and don’t mind browsing in HTML-cluttered text, you can even use this link to navigate to the FTC site map and navigate from page to page in source-code view without triggering the redirect. Again, it’s entirely possible I’m missing something, but if the full site is actually still running, it’s hard to see how a redirect after the real page is served could be avoiding any expenditures.
One possible answer can be found in the policy governing shuttering of government Web sites—which, as blogger Jon Christian noted, stipulates that:

The determination of which services continue during an appropriations lapse is not affected by whether the costs of shutdown exceed the costs of maintaining services.

It’s easy to imagine how this might often be the case: if the “inessential” public-facing Web pages are hosted on the same systems you’ve got to keep up and running for other “essential” back-end purposes—meaning you don’t get to save the security or electricity overhead— then the cost of having IT go through and disable public access to the “inessential” sites could easily be higher than any marginal cost of actually serving the content. But the guidance here seems to require agencies to pull down “inessential” public-facing content even when this requires spending more money than leaving it up would. In the extreme case, you get the bizarre solution implemented on the FTC site: serve the content, then prevent the user from seeing it!

Again, this is all a ploy.
Obama said in his big posturing speech today that “It’s time to stop playing political games” - but this is the political game and it’s the American people being played.
Remember: politicians want to make it hurt:

Inevitably, governments - which have unquenchable thirsts for expansions of power - are forced to face the reality that resources are not infinite. When such encounters with truth occur, the first solutions always (almost without exception) are cuts in those areas in which a plurality of people either expect government to have a role or government’s role is so entrenched (due to its monopoly) that immediate reversals would translate into inconveniences and relative misery for either a majority or a sympathetic minority. The plutocrats want to make it hurt, and often hurt the most people possible. The idea being that if the public can be agitated against proposed cuts, they will acquiesce to tax increases to fund those things they obviously support. 

While the particulars in the current disagreement may be a bit different, the tactics are the same with so-called “government shutdowns.” One side wants to make it clear: “Look what the other side is doing to you, American people!” - and then cuts are made in ways most visible, inconvenient, and/or disruptive.
Consider what is still running and what is not. 
All wars are proceeding as scheduled. Military is 100% funded. Farm and other corporate subsidies will continue for now. The Fed can still do whatever the hell it wants (which pretty much means more QE infinity, forever and ever, keep-kicking-the-can-and-inflating-bubbles, amen). Congress is still getting paid. TSA will still be groping and fondling. All NSA surveillance continues. Nearly everyone at the FBI, CIA, ATF, DEA, et. cetera will report to work. 
Meanwhile, certain welfare - including to low-income pregnant women - and veterans benefits will be cut or delayed. National parks, libraries, and monuments are closed (though often still staffed, but just in an anti-shutdown P.R. capacity by turning people away). The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau will cease processing of requests for new licenses, label approval, and manufacture of non-beverage products - but continue any tax collection. Most food safety inspections will be suspended. The IRS won’t be processing returns (but they have confirmed that your Oct. 15 extension deadline is not delayed).
For a more comprehensive list of what is closed/open during the so-called “shutdown.” click here.
The ruse is blindingly obvious to anyone willing to take off their partisan blinders and see just how easily they are being manipulated.

laliberty:

You are all getting played.

Why would a sudden “lapse” in funding cause web sites to immediately go down? Did the jpegs go on strike? Was the html furloughed? Are government employees required to actively run on hamster wheels in order to keep ones and zeros hosted on a site and a network owned by the government? Indeed, would it not be more expensive to employ people to take down or block access to sites than leaving the data up as-is?

Julian Sanchez points out

Browse to any of their pages and you’ll see, for a split second, the full content of the page you want—only to be redirected to a shutdown notice page also hosted at FTC.gov. But that means… their servers are still up and running and actually serving all the same content. In fact they’re serving more content: first the real page, then the shutdown notice page. If you’re using Firefox or Chrome and don’t mind browsing in HTML-cluttered text, you can even use this link to navigate to the FTC site map and navigate from page to page in source-code view without triggering the redirect. Again, it’s entirely possible I’m missing something, but if the full site is actually still running, it’s hard to see how a redirect after the real page is served could be avoiding any expenditures.

One possible answer can be found in the policy governing shuttering of government Web sites—which, as blogger Jon Christian noted, stipulates that:

The determination of which services continue during an appropriations lapse is not affected by whether the costs of shutdown exceed the costs of maintaining services.

It’s easy to imagine how this might often be the case: if the “inessential” public-facing Web pages are hosted on the same systems you’ve got to keep up and running for other “essential” back-end purposes—meaning you don’t get to save the security or electricity overhead— then the cost of having IT go through and disable public access to the “inessential” sites could easily be higher than any marginal cost of actually serving the content. But the guidance here seems to require agencies to pull down “inessential” public-facing content even when this requires spending more money than leaving it up would. In the extreme case, you get the bizarre solution implemented on the FTC site: serve the content, then prevent the user from seeing it!

Again, this is all a ploy.

Obama said in his big posturing speech today that “It’s time to stop playing political games” - but this is the political game and it’s the American people being played.

Remember: politicians want to make it hurt:

Inevitably, governments - which have unquenchable thirsts for expansions of power - are forced to face the reality that resources are not infinite. When such encounters with truth occur, the first solutions always (almost without exception) are cuts in those areas in which a plurality of people either expect government to have a role or government’s role is so entrenched (due to its monopoly) that immediate reversals would translate into inconveniences and relative misery for either a majority or a sympathetic minority. The plutocrats want to make it hurt, and often hurt the most people possible. The idea being that if the public can be agitated against proposed cuts, they will acquiesce to tax increases to fund those things they obviously support. 

While the particulars in the current disagreement may be a bit different, the tactics are the same with so-called “government shutdowns.” One side wants to make it clear: “Look what the other side is doing to you, American people!” - and then cuts are made in ways most visible, inconvenient, and/or disruptive.

Consider what is still running and what is not. 

All wars are proceeding as scheduled. Military is 100% funded. Farm and other corporate subsidies will continue for now. The Fed can still do whatever the hell it wants (which pretty much means more QE infinity, forever and ever, keep-kicking-the-can-and-inflating-bubbles, amen). Congress is still getting paid. TSA will still be groping and fondling. All NSA surveillance continues. Nearly everyone at the FBI, CIA, ATF, DEA, et. cetera will report to work. 

Meanwhile, certain welfare - including to low-income pregnant women - and veterans benefits will be cut or delayed. National parks, libraries, and monuments are closed (though often still staffed, but just in an anti-shutdown P.R. capacity by turning people away). The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau will cease processing of requests for new licenses, label approval, and manufacture of non-beverage products - but continue any tax collection. Most food safety inspections will be suspended. The IRS won’t be processing returns (but they have confirmed that your Oct. 15 extension deadline is not delayed).

For a more comprehensive list of what is closed/open during the so-called “shutdown.” click here.

The ruse is blindingly obvious to anyone willing to take off their partisan blinders and see just how easily they are being manipulated.

thepeoplesrecord:

The drone that killed my grandson by Nasser al-AwlakiJuly 20, 2013
I learned that my 16-year-old grandson, Abdulrahman — a United States citizen — had been killed by an American drone strike from news reports the morning after he died.
The missile killed him, his teenage cousin and at least five other civilians on Oct. 14, 2011, while the boys were eating dinner at an open-air restaurant in southern Yemen.
I visited the site later, once I was able to bear the pain of seeing where he sat in his final moments. Local residents told me his body was blown to pieces. They showed me the grave where they buried his remains. I stood over it, asking why my grandchild was dead.
Nearly two years later, I still have no answers. The United States government has refused to explain why Abdulrahman was killed. It was not until May of this year that the Obama administration, in a supposed effort to be more transparent, publicly acknowledged what the world already knew — that it was responsible for his death.
The attorney general, Eric H. Holder Jr., said only that Abdulrahman was not “specifically targeted,” raising more questions than he answered.
My grandson was killed by his own government. The Obama administration must answer for its actions and be held accountable. On Friday, I will petition a federal court in Washington to require the government to do just that.
Abdulrahman was born in Denver. He lived in America until he was 7, then came to live with me in Yemen. He was a typical teenager — he watched “The Simpsons,” listened to Snoop Dogg, read “Harry Potter” and had a Facebook page with many friends. He had a mop of curly hair, glasses like me and a wide, goofy smile.
In 2010, the Obama administration put Abdulrahman’s father, my son Anwar, on C.I.A. and Pentagon “kill lists” of suspected terrorists targeted for death. A drone took his life on Sept. 30, 2011.
The government repeatedly made accusations of terrorism against Anwar — who was also an American citizen — but never charged him with a crime. No court ever reviewed the government’s claims nor was any evidence of criminal wrongdoing ever presented to a court. He did not deserve to be deprived of his constitutional rights as an American citizen and killed.
Early one morning in September 2011, Abdulrahman set out from our home in Sana by himself. He went to look for his father, whom he hadn’t seen for years. He left a note for his mother explaining that he missed his father and wanted to find him, and asking her to forgive him for leaving without permission.
A couple of days after Abdulrahman left, we were relieved to receive word that he was safe and with cousins in southern Yemen, where our family is from. Days later, his father was targeted and killed by American drones in a northern province, hundreds of miles away. After Anwar died, Abdulrahman called us and said he was going to return home.
That was the last time I heard his voice. He was killed just two weeks after his father.
A country that believes it does not even need to answer for killing its own is not the America I once knew. From 1966 to 1977, I fulfilled a childhood dream and studied in the United States as a Fulbright scholar, earning my doctorate and then working as a researcher and assistant professor at universities in New Mexico, Nebraska and Minnesota.
I have fond memories of those years. When I first came to the United States as a student, my host family took me camping by the ocean and on road trips to places like Yosemite, Disneyland and New York — and it was wonderful.
After returning to Yemen, I used my American education and skills to help my country, serving as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries and establishing one of the country’s leading institutions of higher learning, Ibb University. Abdulrahman used to tell me he wanted to follow in my footsteps and go back to America to study. I can’t bear to think of those conversations now.
After Anwar was put on the government’s list, but before he was killed, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Center for Constitutional Rights represented me in a lawsuitchallenging the government’s claim that it could kill anyone it deemed an enemy of the state.
The court dismissed the case, saying that I did not have standing to sue on my son’s behalf and that the government’s targeted killing program was outside the court’s jurisdiction anyway.
After the deaths of Abdulrahman and Anwar, I filed another lawsuit, seeking answers and accountability. The government has argued once again that its targeted killing program is beyond the reach of the courts. I find it hard to believe that this can be legal in a constitutional democracy based on a system of checks and balances.
The government has killed a 16-year-old American boy. Shouldn’t it at least have to explain why?

Nasser al-Awlaki, the founder of Ibb University and former president of Sana University, served as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries from 1988 to 1990.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

The drone that killed my grandson by Nasser al-Awlaki
July 20, 2013

I learned that my 16-year-old grandson, Abdulrahman — a United States citizen — had been killed by an American drone strike from news reports the morning after he died.

The missile killed him, his teenage cousin and at least five other civilians on Oct. 14, 2011, while the boys were eating dinner at an open-air restaurant in southern Yemen.

I visited the site later, once I was able to bear the pain of seeing where he sat in his final moments. Local residents told me his body was blown to pieces. They showed me the grave where they buried his remains. I stood over it, asking why my grandchild was dead.

Nearly two years later, I still have no answers. The United States government has refused to explain why Abdulrahman was killed. It was not until May of this year that the Obama administration, in a supposed effort to be more transparent, publicly acknowledged what the world already knew — that it was responsible for his death.

The attorney general, Eric H. Holder Jr., said only that Abdulrahman was not “specifically targeted,” raising more questions than he answered.

My grandson was killed by his own government. The Obama administration must answer for its actions and be held accountable. On Friday, I will petition a federal court in Washington to require the government to do just that.

Abdulrahman was born in Denver. He lived in America until he was 7, then came to live with me in Yemen. He was a typical teenager — he watched “The Simpsons,” listened to Snoop Dogg, read “Harry Potter” and had a Facebook page with many friends. He had a mop of curly hair, glasses like me and a wide, goofy smile.

In 2010, the Obama administration put Abdulrahman’s father, my son Anwar, on C.I.A. and Pentagon “kill lists” of suspected terrorists targeted for death. A drone took his life on Sept. 30, 2011.

The government repeatedly made accusations of terrorism against Anwar — who was also an American citizen — but never charged him with a crime. No court ever reviewed the government’s claims nor was any evidence of criminal wrongdoing ever presented to a court. He did not deserve to be deprived of his constitutional rights as an American citizen and killed.

Early one morning in September 2011, Abdulrahman set out from our home in Sana by himself. He went to look for his father, whom he hadn’t seen for years. He left a note for his mother explaining that he missed his father and wanted to find him, and asking her to forgive him for leaving without permission.

A couple of days after Abdulrahman left, we were relieved to receive word that he was safe and with cousins in southern Yemen, where our family is from. Days later, his father was targeted and killed by American drones in a northern province, hundreds of miles away. After Anwar died, Abdulrahman called us and said he was going to return home.

That was the last time I heard his voice. He was killed just two weeks after his father.

A country that believes it does not even need to answer for killing its own is not the America I once knew. From 1966 to 1977, I fulfilled a childhood dream and studied in the United States as a Fulbright scholar, earning my doctorate and then working as a researcher and assistant professor at universities in New Mexico, Nebraska and Minnesota.

I have fond memories of those years. When I first came to the United States as a student, my host family took me camping by the ocean and on road trips to places like Yosemite, Disneyland and New York — and it was wonderful.

After returning to Yemen, I used my American education and skills to help my country, serving as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries and establishing one of the country’s leading institutions of higher learning, Ibb University. Abdulrahman used to tell me he wanted to follow in my footsteps and go back to America to study. I can’t bear to think of those conversations now.

After Anwar was put on the government’s list, but before he was killed, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Center for Constitutional Rights represented me in a lawsuitchallenging the government’s claim that it could kill anyone it deemed an enemy of the state.

The court dismissed the case, saying that I did not have standing to sue on my son’s behalf and that the government’s targeted killing program was outside the court’s jurisdiction anyway.

After the deaths of Abdulrahman and Anwar, I filed another lawsuit, seeking answers and accountability. The government has argued once again that its targeted killing program is beyond the reach of the courts. I find it hard to believe that this can be legal in a constitutional democracy based on a system of checks and balances.

The government has killed a 16-year-old American boy. Shouldn’t it at least have to explain why?

Nasser al-Awlaki, the founder of Ibb University and former president of Sana University, served as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries from 1988 to 1990.

Source

vicemag:

Omar Khadr: War Criminal, Child Soldier… or Neither?
Omar Khadr made his first appearance in a Canadian court on Monday. After an 11-year journey from Afghanistan to Guantánamo Bay to Canada’s Millhaven Institution, the Toronto-born man is now in Edmonton’s federal prison. He was 15 when he was captured and tortured at Bagram. He turned 27 last Thursday.
If you’re not familiar with the case it goes loosely as follows: When the Americans first arrested Omar in Afghanistan, he was accused of throwing a grenade that killed an American solider. For eight years he maintained his innocence, until he signed a plea deal in 2010 that got him out of Guantánamo. Omar was then convicted of five counts of war crimes for his actions, which were not recognized as such anywhere else in the world including Canada.
Omar’s case is complex. While the American solider he is accused of killing certainly died from a grenade, there is no evidence showing that Omar ever threw one. And while Omar confessed to these crimes, it was after eight years of torture—and given his option to either insist upon his innocence and stay in Gitmo or confess to the crimes and see a judge in Canada, the context of his confession was problematic at best.
The Canadian Supreme Court has even ruled that that Omar’s right were violated, but left the remedy up to the government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who of course declined to provide any solution.
Harper himself has been making strong statements about the trial in an apparent attempt to influence the court proceedings—he’s said that “It is very important that we continue to vigorously defend against any attempts, in court, to lessen his punishment for these heinous acts.”
Omar’s counsel, Dennis Edney, argued that he should be transferred to a provincial prisonfrom a federal institution due to his age when the alleged crimes took place. In a confusing instance of legal doublespeak, the Crown’s prosecutors are arguing that Omar has not really been sentenced to eight years, but rather to five eight-year sentences served at the same time. Associate Chief Justice J.D. Rook has reserved judgment to a currently undetermined future date.
Heather Marsh, a journalist who has followed Omar’s case closely, was in court on Monday and wrote about it for us.
The media swarming Khadr’s lawyer outside of Monday’s hearing. Photo by the author
The court was filled with what seemed to be Omar’s supporters. Many were wearing orange or orange ribbons and I spoke to several of them. There was a high schooler who said she was done with classes for the day, students from several different universities skipping class even though they had exams next week, and people of all ages and ethnic groups. After the media were moved to the jury box and people were encouraged to squeeze together, 120 people were in the courtroom and a live feed was set up for those who had to watch from the overflow room.
Continue

vicemag:

Omar Khadr: War Criminal, Child Soldier… or Neither?

Omar Khadr made his first appearance in a Canadian court on Monday. After an 11-year journey from Afghanistan to Guantánamo Bay to Canada’s Millhaven Institution, the Toronto-born man is now in Edmonton’s federal prison. He was 15 when he was captured and tortured at Bagram. He turned 27 last Thursday.

If you’re not familiar with the case it goes loosely as follows: When the Americans first arrested Omar in Afghanistan, he was accused of throwing a grenade that killed an American solider. For eight years he maintained his innocence, until he signed a plea deal in 2010 that got him out of Guantánamo. Omar was then convicted of five counts of war crimes for his actions, which were not recognized as such anywhere else in the world including Canada.

Omar’s case is complex. While the American solider he is accused of killing certainly died from a grenade, there is no evidence showing that Omar ever threw one. And while Omar confessed to these crimes, it was after eight years of torture—and given his option to either insist upon his innocence and stay in Gitmo or confess to the crimes and see a judge in Canada, the context of his confession was problematic at best.

The Canadian Supreme Court has even ruled that that Omar’s right were violated, but left the remedy up to the government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who of course declined to provide any solution.

Harper himself has been making strong statements about the trial in an apparent attempt to influence the court proceedings—he’s said that “It is very important that we continue to vigorously defend against any attempts, in court, to lessen his punishment for these heinous acts.”

Omar’s counsel, Dennis Edney, argued that he should be transferred to a provincial prisonfrom a federal institution due to his age when the alleged crimes took place. In a confusing instance of legal doublespeak, the Crown’s prosecutors are arguing that Omar has not really been sentenced to eight years, but rather to five eight-year sentences served at the same time. Associate Chief Justice J.D. Rook has reserved judgment to a currently undetermined future date.

Heather Marsh, a journalist who has followed Omar’s case closely, was in court on Monday and wrote about it for us.


The media swarming Khadr’s lawyer outside of Monday’s hearing. Photo by the author

The court was filled with what seemed to be Omar’s supporters. Many were wearing orange or orange ribbons and I spoke to several of them. There was a high schooler who said she was done with classes for the day, students from several different universities skipping class even though they had exams next week, and people of all ages and ethnic groups. After the media were moved to the jury box and people were encouraged to squeeze together, 120 people were in the courtroom and a live feed was set up for those who had to watch from the overflow room.

Continue

6 Shocking Revelations About How Private Prisons Make Their Money

thefreelioness:

In a press teleconference about the report, Reverend Michael McBride, director of Urban Strategies and Lifelines to Healing at PICO National Network said the real human impact of having lockup quotas was unjustifiable.

“It’s important for us to step back and look at this from a moral perspective; all people of any faith or no faith at all can claim it’s reprehensible to imprison someone for making money or financial motives,” he said. “It’s important to always remember every single person is a human being … even if they have done something we may find problematic or illegal. They are not profit incentives.”

Here are six of the most shocking facts about prison privatization and corporatization, from the report.

  1. 65 percent of the private prison contracts ITPI received and analyzed included occupancy guarantees in the form of quotas or required payments for empty prison cells (a “low-crime tax”). These quotas and low-crime taxes put taxpayers on the hook for guaranteeing profits for private prison corporations.
  2. Occupancy guarantee clauses in private prison contracts range between 80% and 100%, with 90% as the most frequent occupancy guarantee requirement.
  3. Arizona, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Virginia are locked in contracts with the highest occupancy guarantee requirements, with all quotas requiring between 95% and 100% occupancy.
  4. Though crime has dropped by a third in the past decade, an occupancy requirement covering three for-profit prisons has forced taxpayers in Colorado to pay an additional $2 million.
  5. Three Arizona for-profit prison contracts have a staggering 100% quota, even though a 2012 analysis from Tucson Citizen shows that the company’s per-day charge for each prisoner has increased an average of 13.9% over the life of the contracts.
  6. A 20-year deal to privately operate the Lake Erie Correctional Institution in Ohio includes a 90% quota, and has contributed to cutting corners on safety, including overcrowding, areas without secure doors and an increase in crime both inside the prison and in the surrounding community.

Prison Shocker: U.S. Imprisons Three Times as Many Black People as South Africa During Apartheid

Excerpt (AP) - The Same Terrorists The US is Arming in Syria Are Killing Civilians in Kenya:

otterwalks:

Tony Cartalucci is quoted herein from “Activist Post”…  23rd September 2013 

Titled - Kenyan Bloodbath: Reaping the “Benefits” of US AFRICOM Collaboration

      “NATO’s North African Terror Tidal Wave Predictably Sweeps Into Kenya.”   

image  
 Beginning in 2011, geopolitical analysts warned that US, British and French intervention in Libya would create a terror emirate that would unleash a tidal wave of militant destabilization across Northern Africa and beyond. From Mali to Kenya, and as far as Syria, violence directly linked to the militants and the aid and weapons they received from the West in Libya, have now been felt. 

image 

Image: (click image to enlarge) Truly NATO’s intervention in Libya has been a resounding success. Not only has the West managed to revive the terrorist LIFG organization Qaddafi had been fighting successfully for decades, but now “international institutions” have a casus belli spreading across the whole of North Africa, into the Middle East and beyond as NATO weapons and Western cash enable LIFG fighters to battle as far as Syria in the east and Mali to the west. The wave of terror unleashed and the predictable “pretexts” it will provide, has now swept into Kenya.

Shortly after NATO’s intervention in Libya, it was Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), a US State Department listed terror organization (listed #38), that played a central role in the invasion of northern Mali, which provided the pretext for French military intervention and occupation. AQIM of course, was merged with Al Qaeda’s Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), the ground troops used in NATO’s regime change operation in Libya starting in 2011. In a 2007 West Point Combating Terrorism Center (CTC) report and a 2011 CTC report, “Are Islamist Extremists Fighting Among Libya’s Rebels?,” AQIM is specifically mentioned as working closely with the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG). The latter report admits: 

There have also been reports during the past few years of a handful of Libyans who have traveled to Algeria to train with al-Qa`ida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), although these reports are unconfirmed. AQIM has sought to capitalize on the situation in Libya.

Geopolitical analyst Pepe Escobar would elaborate in an Asia Times piece titled, “How al-Qaeda got to rule in Tripoli,” that:

"Crucially, still in 2007, then al-Qaeda’s number two, Zawahiri, officially announced the merger between the LIFG and al-Qaeda in the Islamic Mahgreb (AQIM). So, for all practical purposes, since then, LIFG/AQIM have been one and the same - and Belhaj was/is its emir."

"Belhaj," referring to Hakim Abdul Belhaj, leader of LIFG in Libya, led with NATO support, arms, funding, and diplomatic recognition, the overthrowing of Muammar Qaddafi and has now plunged the nation into racist genocidal infighting. This intervention has also seen the rebellion’s epicenter of Benghazi peeling off from Tripoli as a semi-autonomous “Terror-Emirate.” Belhaj’s latest campaign has shifted to Syria where he was admittedly on the Turkish-Syrian border pledging weapons, money, and fighters to the so-called “Free Syrian Army,” again, under the auspices of NATO support.   

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There are several ways to link to this article in full. Above is from beyond the “Read More” after the usual short introduction on the “Activist Post” scroll… 

For your consideration…  o… 

Gangster State US/UK

image

'It is fashionable in the US and UK governments and among their sycophants to speak of “gangster state Russia.” But we all know who the gangsters are. The worst criminals of our time are the US and UK governments. Both are devoid of all integrity, all honor, all mercy, all humanity. Many members of both governments would have made perfect functionaries in Stalinist Russia or Nazi Germany.'

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Activist Post: US False Flag Pretext for War on Syria

otterwalks:

Long and informative article…